Intertidal ecology topics

ME149 A comparison of pristine and degraded mangroves in Akumal and the impact of mangrove degradation on adjacent seagrasses and coral reefs

(start dates 12 June or 26 June)

This project has a waiting list

Mangrove forests are highly productive marine ecosystems that are essential for the health of adjacent ecosystems e.g. sea grass beds and coral reefs. Yet, as much as 1 – 2% of the global mangrove forests are lost per year. Mangroves draw down atmospheric CO2 sequester and trap fine sediments, facilitate vital biodiversity mechanisms (e.g. fish nurseries) and improve fishery productivity. Despite the obvious importance of mangroves, mangrove forests in the Yucatan Peninsula have been under considerable anthropogenic impact from harvesting, causing a reduction in important habitat and biodiversity, carbon sequestration, and the productivity of adjacent sea grass and coral reef ecosystems. If the ecosystem services that mangroves provide can be quantified, then there is scope to develop a mangrove equivalent of the REDD programme in which fishing communities could receive economic investment in exchange for continued protection of the mangroves. Projects could therefore focus on a comparison of the structure, function, and faunal diversity of pristine and degraded mangroves, or an investigation of wood degradation processes across mangroves of differing quality. In addition, projects could investigate health and diversity of seagrasses and coral reefs in relation to the level of degradation of adjacent mangroves. Belt transects and permanent plots will be used to record tree composition, basal areas and tree densities. Biodiversity assessments will be conducted by investigation of the available mangrove substrata. Snorkel and dive based transect and quadrat surveys may be used to assess diversity and coverage of seagrasses, hard corals and algae.

Extended Project Summary


ME150 Understanding the non-conventional cenote-mangrove forest system

(start dates 12 June or 26 June)

The Yucatan Peninsula is formed of limestone karst substrate that was once coral reef. As limestone is porous, rainwater seeps through the rock surface to form an extensive network of underground rivers accessed from the surface by sink holes, known locally as cenotes. Mangrove forests associated with cenotes in coastal regions are not new, but research of them is. This novel project aims to investigate the driving forces behind the structure and function of these unusual mangrove ecosystems and to investigate differences of animal community structure in comparison with coastal mangrove forests. The majority of mangrove animals exploit the available hard substrata within mangrove ecosystems. Areas such as mangrove prop roots and in particular large wood detritus (LWD) are favourable for most mangrove fauna, but nothing is known about the organisms that process the fixed carbon in cenote mangrove forests. Projects may highlight new and unreported information from forest structure and function, to mangrove fauna diversity and niche separation. Continuous belt transects and plots will be used to establish the tree structure, composition and basal areas with the cenote mangrove forests. Biodiversity assessments of the fauna upon mangrove roots, substratum and LWD will be made, and animal observations will be employed. Degradation processes of LWD will be recorded in the forests and compared with those from conventional mangrove forests.

Extended Project Summary